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Seasonal Variation of the Photochemical Control of Ozone in the Lower Free Troposphere Based on Observations from the Free Tropospheric Experiments at Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps

  • P. Zanis
  • P. S. Monks
  • E. Schuepbach
  • T. Green
  • A. Rickard
  • G. Mills
  • L. J. Carpenter
  • S. A. Penkett
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 30)

Abstract

Ozone is one of the most important trace gases in the troposphere being on the one hand an integral element in the control of the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and on the other hand a climate gas. Although there is still a debate on the relative contribution from photochemistry and stratospheric intrusions to the origin of tropospheric ozone, the current consensus view is that photochemistry is the major contributor to the observed ozone levels [1, 2]. The ozone in the troposphere displays a clear seasonal cycle, which depends on a multitude of factors, such as the proximity to large source areas of ozone precursors, the geographical location and meteorological factors. In certain locations such as in the free troposphere or unpolluted sites in the Northern hemisphere tropospheric ozone shows a spring maximum but there has been much debate as to the origins of this phenomenon mainly due to the problems rising from the interpretation of measurements and the interactions of processes occurring on differing scales from the local to the global scale [3]. Several chemical theories were developed to explain the observed spring ozone maximum in the free troposphere of the Northern midlatitudes [4, 5].

Keywords

Tropospheric Ozone Ozone Production Free Troposphere Stratospheric Intrusion Swiss Federal Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Zanis
    • 2
    • 1
  • P. S. Monks
    • 3
  • E. Schuepbach
    • 1
  • T. Green
    • 4
  • A. Rickard
    • 3
  • G. Mills
    • 4
  • L. J. Carpenter
    • 5
  • S. A. Penkett
    • 4
  1. 1.CABO, Physical GeographyUniversity of BerneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Laboratory of Atmospheric PhysicsAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryUniversity of LeicesterUK
  4. 4.School of Environmental SciencesUniversity of East AngliaUK
  5. 5.Department of ChemistryUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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