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Modeling of Aerosol Processes in the Mediterranean Area

  • M. Lazaridis
  • A. Spiridaki
  • S. Solberg
  • T. Svendby
  • G. Kallos
  • F. Flatøy
  • C. Housiadas
  • J. Smolik
  • I. Colbeck
  • K. Eleftheriadis
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 30)

Abstract

The mesoscale model UAM-AERO coupled with the prognostic meteorological model RAMS has been applied to study the dynamics of photochemical gaseous species and particulate matter processes in the eastern Mediterranean area between the Greek mainland and the island of Crete. In addition, the regional NILU-CTM model is used for the determination of the background air quality data. The modeling platform is applied to simulate atmospheric conditions for the period between 11-30 July 2000. In the current paper the spatial and temporal distribution of gaseous and particulate matter pollutants has been extensively studied together with identification of major emission sources in the area.

Keywords

Secondary Organic Aerosol Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Photochemical Pollutant Particulate Matter Pollutant Eastern Mediterranean Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lazaridis
    • 1
  • A. Spiridaki
    • 1
  • S. Solberg
    • 2
  • T. Svendby
    • 2
  • G. Kallos
    • 5
  • F. Flatøy
    • 2
  • C. Housiadas
    • 4
  • J. Smolik
    • 6
  • I. Colbeck
    • 3
  • K. Eleftheriadis
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Environmental EngineeringTechnical University of CreteChaniaGreece
  2. 2.Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU)KjellerNorway
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of EssexUK
  4. 4.N.C.S.R. DemokritosAttikiGreece
  5. 5.Department of PhysicsUniversity of AthensGreece
  6. 6.Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, ASCRPragueCzech Republic

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