Arbovirus Diseases

  • Bruce F. Eldridge
  • Thomas W. Scott
  • Jonathan F. Day
  • Walter J. Tabachnick
Chapter

Abstract

Arboviruses are a diverse group of microorganisms that share the common feature of being biologically transmitted to vertebrate hosts by arthropods. Arboviruses occur in nearly all parts of the world except the polar ice caps.

Keywords

Japanese Encephalitis Virus Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever African Swine Fever Virus Rift Valley Fever Virus Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce F. Eldridge
    • 1
  • Thomas W. Scott
    • 1
  • Jonathan F. Day
    • 2
  • Walter J. Tabachnick
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Florida Medical Entomology LaboratoryVero BeachUSA

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