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Biological Dosimetry And Applications In Turkey

  • D. Dalci
  • G. Dorter
  • I. Ilbilgi
  • G. Koksal
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 33)

Abstract

A radiological accident is defined as an event involving overexposure or contamination of persons and/or the environment by radioactive material. A radiological accident involves a sealed or unsealed radiation source and leads to an uncontrolled release of ionizing radiation or radioactive materials into the environment. Such radiation sources include X ray equipment, sealed radioactive isotope sources (such as 60Co, 137Cs or 192Ir irradiators) used mostly in medicine and industry, and unsealed sources used in nuclear medicine and scientific research 1.

Keywords

Chromosomal Aberration Chromosome Aberration Cytogenetic Technique Radiation Accident Biological Dosimetry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Dalci
    • 1
  • G. Dorter
    • 1
  • I. Ilbilgi
    • 1
  • G. Koksal
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiobiology DepartmentCekmece Nuclear Research and Training CenterIstanbulTurkey

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