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Implications of Population Decline for the European Union (2000–2050)

  • J. Diez-Nicolás
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 37)

Abstract

Population prospects for the European Union seem to coincide in forecasting a general population decline for this area, due to a persistent low level of fertility (below replacement level) and an increasing ageing of the population [9], Population trends in the European Union countries are very similar at present, both when the present 15 or the 10 candidate countries are considered. They all have the lowest rates of growth, the lowest fertility rates, and the highest life expectancies, which combined are producing the most aged populations in the world. If these trends continue the population of the European Union will not only decline, but will become even more aged, and will have a smaller population force. Some of the measures that have been proposed to avoid this prospect are to increase fertility and to increase immigration, under the assumption that they will increase population growth, that they will make the population younger and that they will increase the population force. This paper intends to demonstrate that higher fertility and immigration are not the only possible answers to these processes, and that some benefits may also be derived from non growing and ageing populations, provided that societies adopt the necessary changes to adapt to this new demographic situation.

Keywords

Total Fertility Rate European Union Country Replacement Level Lower Fertility Rate Candidate Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Diez-Nicolás
    • 1
  1. 1.Facultad de CC. PoliticasUniversidad ComplutenseMadridSpain

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