Designed Porous Media

  • A. Bejan
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAII, volume 134)

Abstract

This chapter reviews a series of developments that point in the direction of applying porous media concepts to the description, simulation and optimization of compact systems with complex flow structures, see Bejan et al. [6]. Compact and miniaturized heat exchangers are primary examples of this trend. Other examples are chemical reactors, fiber filters, brush seals, and the modeling of micro-segregation during the solidification of alloys. The new aspect highlighted by these developments is that flow structures are optimized so that flow systems exhibit maximum global performance subject to global constraints. Optimization of flow structure means that in the beginning the flow geometry is free to change. The system is free to morph. Global performance is achieved through the generation of flow architecture, see Bejan [2]. In this way the flow structure becomes a porous medium with purpose, i.e. a designed porous medium.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Natural Convection Rayleigh Number Heat Transfer Rate Heat Mass Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Bejan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials ScienceDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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