The ‘Religious Question’ in the Straits Settlements

Chapter
Part of the ARI - Springer Asia Series book series (ARI, volume 1)

Abstract

The administration of ‘native’ affairs and the underlying colonial logic at work in a managerial approach to political governance have been the subject of much scholarly interest. For example, we know of the deep and systematic interference by colonial administrators into native affairs, including the supervision, regulation, policing and sometimes persecution of non-Christian religious traditions in former colonies.1 Such an analysis has yet to be undertaken for British Malaya. Any account of European colonial encounters with the non-European world has, from the outset, to be embedded in a series of caveats. No generic, universal statements will be appropriate and it would be a folly to speak of a singular colonial experience. How European colonial powers dealt with the religious beliefs and practices of their non-Christian subjects in the territories they administered is a theme that has been exceedingly popular with students of colonial history.

Keywords

Chinese Community Religious Pluralism Secret Society Religious Tolerance Missionary Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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