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Effects of Soy Peptone-Supplemented Medium on CHO-320 Cells

  • Jean-François Michiels
  • Jérémie Barbau
  • Sébastien Sart
  • Spiros N. Agathos
  • Yves-Jacques Schneider
Conference paper
Part of the ESACT Proceedings book series (ESACT, volume 5)

Abstract

A strong tendency is currently emerging to remove not only serum but also any product of animal origin from animal cell culture media during production of biopharmaceuticals. The cell line CHO-320 producing human γ-interferon was cultivated in a serum- and protein-free medium supplemented with a soy peptone (Hy-Soy®, Kerry). Although the addition of this plant peptone to the culture medium resulted in a decreased cell growth, an increase of recombinant protein production was observed. Experiments were conducted to elucidate how the peptone contributes to an increased protein production. Results related to transcription activation, protein glycosylation, apoptotic cell death and protein stability suggested that none of these mechanisms could explain the peptone effect. That soy peptone increases protein translation or improves protein secretion is suggested.

Keywords

Recombinant Protein Production Protein Glycosylation Decrease Cell Growth Glycosylation Profile Animal Cell Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-François Michiels
    • 1
  • Jérémie Barbau
    • 1
  • Sébastien Sart
    • 2
  • Spiros N. Agathos
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yves-Jacques Schneider
    • 1
  1. 1.Biochimie Cellulaire, Nutritionnelle & ToxicologiqueInstitut des Sciences de la Vie, Université Catholique de LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  2. 2.Université Catholique de Louvain, Institut des Sciences de la Vie, Unit of BioengineeringLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  3. 3.Unit of BioengineeringInstitut des Sciences de la Vie, Université Catholique de LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  4. 4.Genie Biologique, Institut Des Sciences De La Vie, Université Catholique de LouvainInstitut des Sciences de la Vie, Université Catholique de LouvainLouvain-La-NeuveBelgium

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