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An Optimised Transfection Platform for the Epi-CHO Transient Expression System in Serum-free Media

  • Joe Codamo
  • Trent P. Munro
  • Benjamin S. Hughes
  • Michael Song
  • Peter P. Gray
Conference paper
Part of the ESACT Proceedings book series (ESACT, volume 5)

Abstract

Transient gene expression systems in mammalian cells continue to grow in popularity due to their capacity to produce significant amounts of recombinant protein in a rapid and scalable manner, without the lengthy time periods and resources required for stable cell line development. In this report, we demonstrate enhanced, high-level monoclonal antibody (mAb) titres of 136 mg/L with CHO cells using the episomal-based transient expression system, Epi-CHO. These high titres were achieved by implementing an optimised transfection protocol and through screening of a variety of chemically defined and serum-free media for their ability to support elevated and prolonged viable cell densities post-transfection, and in turn, improve recombinant protein yields. The Epi-CHO system allows for scalable and rapid production of CHO cell-derived recombinant proteins in serum-free conditions.

Keywords

Heavy Chain Viable Cell Density Transient Expression System Recombinant Protein Yield Optimise Transfection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Karen Hughes and the NCRIS Biologics Facility at the AIBN and Robert Simpson from the Real-time PCR Facility at The University of Queensland.

References

  1. Geisse S. 2009. Reflections on more than 10 years of TGE approaches. Protein Expr Purif 64(2):99–107.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Kunaparaju R, Liao M, Sunstrom NA. 2005. Epi-CHO, an episomal expression system for recombinant protein production in CHO cells. Biotechnol Bioeng 91(6):670–777.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Matasci M, Hacker DL, Baldi L, Wurm FM. 2008. Recombinant therapeutic protein production in cultivated mammalian cells: current status and future prospects. Drug Discov Today: Technol 5(2–3):e37–e42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joe Codamo
    • 1
  • Trent P. Munro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Benjamin S. Hughes
    • 1
  • Michael Song
    • 1
  • Peter P. Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Acyte Biotech Pty LtdBrisbaneAustralia

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