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Superoxide and Hydroxyl Radical Chemistry in Aqueous Solution

  • Benon H. J. Bielski
  • Diane E. Cabelli
Part of the Structure Energetics and Reactivity in Chemistry Series (SEARCH Series) book series (SEARCH, volume 2)

Abstract

This chapter reviews some of the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the OH/O- and HO2/O- 2 radicals in aqueous solutions, their formation by chemical and physical methods, and their reactivity with some organic compounds and metal ions/metal complexes. Whereas the OH radical is the strongest oxidant of the oxy-radicals, the HO2/O- 2 species are not very reactive in the absence of metal catalysts. Their contrasting properties will be illustrated using Cu, Fe, and Mn metal ions/complexes and certain specific organic compounds such as ascorbic acid, a water-soluble α-tocopherol analog (Trolox) and some amino acids.

Keywords

Copper Complex Flash Photolysis Pulse Radiolysis Radiation Chemistry Hydrated Electron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Chapman & Hall 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benon H. J. Bielski
  • Diane E. Cabelli

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