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Towards a heuristic model of adoption

  • Koos van Dijken
  • Yvonne Prince
  • Teun Wolters
  • Marco Frey
  • Giuliano Mussati
  • Paul Kalff
  • Ole Hansen
  • Søren Kerndrup
  • Bent Søndergârd
  • Eduarde Lopes Rodrigues
  • Sandra Meredith
Part of the Eco-Efficiency In Industry And Science book series (ECOE, volume 2)

Abstract

The current environmental problems caused by industry stem from the accumulation of effects, which at some point in time appear to exceed the critical boundaries of the ecosystems. It is this cumulative effect, contributed to by the activities of a multiplicity of industrial plants, which is difficult to control and likely to place limits on future industrial development unless great attention is paid to the defining and achieving of economically and ecologically sustainable pathways.

Keywords

Innovation Process Adoption Process Technical Survey Environmental Innovation Incremental Innovation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koos van Dijken
    • 1
  • Yvonne Prince
    • 1
  • Teun Wolters
    • 1
  • Marco Frey
    • 2
  • Giuliano Mussati
    • 2
  • Paul Kalff
    • 3
  • Ole Hansen
    • 4
  • Søren Kerndrup
    • 4
  • Bent Søndergârd
    • 4
  • Eduarde Lopes Rodrigues
    • 5
  • Sandra Meredith
    • 6
  1. 1.EIM Small Business Research & ConsultancyZoetermeerThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Bocconi UniversityMilanItaly
  3. 3.TNO Strategy, Technology and PolicyDelftThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Roskilde UniversityDenmark
  5. 5.IAPMEILisbonPortugal
  6. 6.University of BrightonUK

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