Advertisement

Extending Connections: Linking Support for Teachers Engaging in and Using Research with What Is Known About Teacher Learning and Development

  • Philippa Cordingley
Chapter
Part of the Professional Learning and Development in Schools and Higher Education book series (PROD, volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter is focussed on our developing understanding of how to support teachers engaging in and using research through both an exploration of 14 years of national developments in England and through the lens of the evidence base about continuing professional development (CPD). The national initiatives explored range from communicating research findings in a progressive ladder of accessible formats to the setting up of a centre that funded systematic reviews of research in order to provide a cumulative and consistent evidence base. It sets these alongside the range of influential initiatives designed to support teacher enquiry involving some 39,500 teachers over the two years considered for this chapter (approximately 9% of the profession). The chapter goes on to identify and explore processes key to involving the wider teaching population in using research based on findings from a number of systematic reviews about CPD carried out over the last seven years. The chapter concludes with a case study example of how the evidence base about CPD derived from these reviews was used to create a national framework for mentoring and coaching that enabled the transformation of knowledge and CPD into practice and that sets engagement with the public knowledge base at its heart.

Keywords

Professional Learning Continue Professional Development Teacher Research Continue Professional Development Programme Teacher Professional Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Bell, M., & Cordingley, P. (2007). Transferring learning and taking innovation to scale. London: Innovation Unit. (Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE), www.curee-paccts.com/resources/publications/transferring-learning-and-taking-innovation-scale. Accessed 27 Mar 2009).
  2. Bell, M., Cordingley, P., Gibbons, S., & Hawkins, M. (2008). Review of individual studies from systematic research reviews. Coventry: CUREE. (www.curee-paccts.com/files/publication/1224771081/Review.pdf. Accessed 1 Apr 2009).
  3. Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. London: Kings College.Google Scholar
  4. Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee, C., Marshall, B., & Wiliam, D. (2003). Assessment for learning: Putting it into practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bolam, R., & Weindling, D. (2006). Synthesis of research and evaluation projects concerned with capacity-building through teachers’ professional development. Thousand Oaks: Corwin.Google Scholar
  6. Bruner, J. (1960). The process of education. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE) (2007). Harnessing knowledge to practice: Accessing and using evidence from research. London: Innovation Unit.Google Scholar
  8. Cordingley, P. (2001). Closing the gap: Increasing research impact through teacher involvement in research design and review. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, 13–15 September.Google Scholar
  9. Cordingley, P. (2008a). Research and evidence-informed practice: Focusing on practice and practitioners. Cambridge Journal of Education, 38(1), 39–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cordingley, P. (2008b). Sauce for the Goose. Coventry: CUREE. (www.curee-paccts.com/node/631. Accessed 26 Mar 2009).
  11. Cordingley, P., Bell, M., Rundell, B., & Evans, D. (2003a). The impact of collaborative CPD on classroom teaching and learning. Report in Research Evidence in Education Library. London: EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. (www.eppi.ioe.ac.uk/cms/Default.aspx?tabid = 132. Accessed 31 Aug 2010).Google Scholar
  12. Cordingley, P., Bell, M., & Rundell, B. (2003b). How does CPD affect teaching and learning? Issues in systematic reviewing from a practitioner perspective. Paper presented at the annual conference of the British Educational Research Association, Edinburgh, UK, 11–13 Sept 2003.Google Scholar
  13. Cordingley, P., Bell, M., Thomason, S., & Firth, A. (2005a). The impact of collaborative continuing professional development (CPD) on classroom teaching and learning. Review: How do collaborative and sustained CPD and sustained but not collaborative CPD affect teaching and learning? Report in Research Evidence in Education Library. London: EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. (www.eppi.ioe.ac.uk/cms/Default.aspx?tabid = 136. Accessed 31 Aug 2010).Google Scholar
  14. Cordingley, P., Bell, M., Evans, D., & Firth, A. (2005b). The impact of collaborative CPD on classroom teaching and learning. Review: What do teacher impact data tell us about collaborative CPD? Report in Research Evidence in Education Library. London: EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. (www.eppi.ioe.ac.uk/cms/Default.aspx?tabid = 139. Accessed 31 Aug 2010).Google Scholar
  15. Cordingley, P., Bell, M., Isham, C., Evans, D., & Firth, A. (2007). What do specialists do in CPD programmes for which there is evidence of positive outcomes for pupils and teachers? Report in Research Evidence in Education Library. London: EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. www.eppi.ioe.ac.uk/cms/Default.aspx?tabid = 2275. Accessed 31 Aug 2010.Google Scholar
  16. Creasy, J., & Paterson, F. (2005). Leading coaching in schools. Nottingham: NCSL.Google Scholar
  17. Department for Children, Schools and Families. Standards site—The research for informed practice site. www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/research/. Accessed 26 Mar 2009.
  18. Desforges, C. (1995). How does experiences affect theoretical knowledge for teaching? Learning and Instruction, 5, 285–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Dewey, J. (1991). How we think. New York: Prometheus.Google Scholar
  20. Earl, L., Katz, S., Elgie, S., Jaafar, S., & Foster, L. (2006). How networked learning communities work: Volume 1—The report. Toronto: Aporia Consulting. (networkedlearning.ncsl.org.uk/collections/network-research-series/reports/how-networked-learning-communities-work.pdf. Accessed 31 Aug 2010).Google Scholar
  21. Edwards, A., Sebba, J., & Rickinson, M. (2005). Making a difference: Collaborating with users to develop additional research. London: TLRP.Google Scholar
  22. Edwards, A., Sebba, J., & Rickinson, M. (2007). Working with users: some implications for educational research. British Educational Research Journal, 33(5), 647–661.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Eraut, M. (1994). Developing professional knowledge and competence. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  24. Furlong, J., Salisbury, J., & Coombes, L. (2003). Best practice research scholarships: An evaluation. A report commissioned by the DfES. Cardiff: Cardiff University School of Social Sciences.Google Scholar
  25. Galton, M. (2000). Integrating theory and practice: Teachers’ perspectives on educational research. Paper presented at the TLRP Annual Conference, Leicester, 1 Nov. (www.tlrp.org/acadpub/Galton2000.pdf).
  26. Gardner, J. (2008). Editorial. Cambridge Journal of Education, 38(1), 1–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Guskey, T. R. (1986). Staff development and the process of change. Educational Researcher, 15(5), 5–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Guskey, T. R. (2000). Evaluating professional development. Thousand Oaks: Corwin.Google Scholar
  29. Hammersley, M. (2001). On ‘systematic’ reviews of research literatures: A ‘narrative’ response to Evans & Benefield. British Educational Research Journal, 27(5), 543–554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Hargreaves, D. H. (1996). Teaching as a research based profession: Possibilities and prospect. The Teacher Training Agency annual lecture. London: TTA.Google Scholar
  31. Hillage, J., Pearson, R., Anderson, A., & Tamkin, P. (1998). Excellence in research on schools. Research Report RR74. London: Department for Education and Employment.Google Scholar
  32. Huberman, A. M. (2002). Moving towards the inevitable: The sharing of research in education. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 8(3/4), 257–268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. James, M., Black, P., McCormick, R., Pedder, D., & Wiliam, D. et al. (2006). Learning how to learn in classrooms, schools and networks: Aims, design and analysis. Research Papers in Education, 21(2), 101–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (1988). Student achievement through staff development. New York: Longman.Google Scholar
  35. Marshall, B., & Drummond, M.-J. (2006). How teachers engage with assessment for learning: Lessons from the classroom. Research Papers in Education, 21(2), 133–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Nonaka, I., & Takeuchi, H. (1995). The knowledge creating company: How Japanese companies create dynamics of innovation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Nutley, S., Walters, I., & Davies, H. (2003). From knowing to doing: A framework for understanding the evidence-into-practice agenda. Evaluation, 9(2), 132–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Nutley, S. M., et al. (2007). Using evidence: How research can inform public services. Bristol: Policy.Google Scholar
  39. Oakley, A. (2003). Research evidence, knowledge management and educational practice: Early lessons from a systematic approach. London Review of Education, 1(1), 21–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Oates, T. (2007). Protecting the innocent—The need for ethical frameworks within mass education innovation. In L. Saunders (Ed.), Educational research and policy making. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  41. OECD. (2002, September). Educational research and development in EnglandOECD review, examiner’s report. Ref No. CERI/CD. Portsmouth: OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI).Google Scholar
  42. Pollard, A. (2008). Knowledge transformation and impact: Aspirations and experiences from TLRP. Cambridge Journal of Education, 38(1), 5–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Robinson, V. (2007). School leadership and student outcomes: Identifying what works and why. ACEL Monograph Series. (www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2515/13723. Accessed 27 Mar 2009).
  44. Saunders, L. (2007). Go-betweens, gofers, or mediators? Exploring the role and responsibilities of research managers in policy organisations. In L. Saunders (Ed.), Educational research and policy making: Exploring the border country between research and policy. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  45. Sharp, C., Handscomb, G., & Webster, M. (2006). Broadening horizons: Research-engaged schools. Paper presented at the 19th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement, Fort Lauderdale.Google Scholar
  46. Shulman, L. S. (1987). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of new reforms. Harvard Education Review, 57, 1–21.Google Scholar
  47. Stenhouse, L. (1980). Curriculum research and development in action. Oxford: Heinemann.Google Scholar
  48. Sylva, K., et al. (2004). The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) project: Final report. A longitudinal study funded by the DfES 1997–2004.Google Scholar
  49. Tacon, R., & Atkinson, R. (2001). Using visual structured images for teaching mental arithmetic. Teacher Research Grant Scheme: TTA.Google Scholar
  50. Timperley, H., Wilson, A., Barrar, H., & Fung, I. (2006). Professional learning and development: A best evidence synthesis of impact on student outcomes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  51. Timperley, H., Wilson, A., Barrar, H., & Fung, I. (2007). Teacher professional learning and development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration (BES). Wellington: Ministry of Education.Google Scholar
  52. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in EducationCoventryUK

Personalised recommendations