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Abstract

Sugarcane (Saccharum L. spp. and Saccharum interspecific hybrids) and sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L. and Beta interspecific hybrids) are the two principal sources of world sugar. Sugarbeet, grown in 49 countries accounts for 28% of world sugar production, while sugarcane grown in 82 countries accounts for the remaining 72% (Anon 2002). In 2000/01, 93.7 million tonnes of sugar was produced from sugarcane. India and Brazil (20.1 and 17.0 m tonnes, respectively) are the two largest cane sugar producers followed by China (5.8), Mexico (5.2) and Thailand (5.2) (Anon 2002).

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Yellow Leaf Maize Streak Virus Transgenic Sugarcane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grant R. Smith
    • 1
  • Philippe Rott
    • 2
  1. 1.David North Plant Research CentreBureau of Sugar Experiment StationsIndooroopillyAustralia
  2. 2.UMR 385 ENSAM-INRA-CIRAD Biologie et Génétique des Interactions Plante-ParasiteMontpellier Cedex 5France

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