Advertisement

Paradigms and Knowledge: Understanding the Field of Cognitive Studies and Educational Psychology

  • Curry Stephenson Malott
Chapter
Part of the Explorations of Educational Purpose book series (EXEP, volume 15)

Abstract

As we engage the field of educational psychology our primary concern is understanding the historical development of the paradigms and knowledge that constitute the substance of its internal content. Situating these ideas in a social, historical context will assist the reader in comprehending the complex, dialectical nature of theory and practice and the ways the larger social forces of competing class interests always inform the knowledge production process, in both complex and contradictory ways.

Keywords

Educational Psychology Educational Leader Western Science Critical Pedagogy Labor Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Adams, D. (1995). Education for extinction: American Indians and the boarding school experience. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.Google Scholar
  2. Anthony, M. (2008). Integrated intelligence: Classical and contemporary depictions of mind and intelligence and their educational implications. Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  3. Barba, R. (1998). Science in the multicultural classroom. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  4. Barsky, R. (2007). The Chomsky effect: A radical works beyond the Ivory tower. London: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bernal, M. (1987). Black Athena: The Afroasiatic roots of classical civilization. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Bernstein, J. (2009). Foreword. In V. Deloria, Jr. (Au.), P. J. Deloria & J. S. Bernstein (Eds.), C.G. Jung and the Sioux traditions: Dreams, visions, nature, and the primitive. New Orleans, LA: Spring Journal Books.Google Scholar
  7. Brayboy, B. M. J., & Castagno, A. E. (2008). How might native science inform “informal science learning? Cultural Studies of Science Education, 3, 731–750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. London: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Bruner, J. (1996). The culture of education. London: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Cary, R. (2004). Howard Gardner’s theory of visual-spatial intelligence: A critical retheorizing. In J. L. Kincheloe (Ed.), Multiple intelligences reconsidered. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  11. Chaillé, C. (2008). Constructivism across the curriculum in early childhood classrooms: Big ideas as inspiration. Boston: Pearson.Google Scholar
  12. Chomsky, N. (1983). Things no amount of learning can teach. Interview by John Gliedman. Omni, 6: 11.Google Scholar
  13. Chomsky, N. (1988). Language and problems of knowledge: The Managua lectures. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  14. Chomsky, N. (2003). Reply to Lycan. In L. M. Antony & N. Hornstein (Eds.), Chomsky and his critics. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar
  15. Chomsky, N. (2009). Conclusion. In M. Piattelli-Palmarini, J. Uriagereka, & P. Salaburu (Eds.), Of minds & language: A dialogue with Noam Chomsky in the Basque Country. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Churchill, W. (2004). Kill the Indian, save the man: The genocidal impact of American Indian residential schools. San Francisco: City Lights.Google Scholar
  17. Cole, M., & Scribner, S. (1978). Introduction. In L. S. Vygotsky (Ed.), Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. London: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Darwin, C. (2007). The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex: The concise edition; selections and commentary by Carl Zimmer. New York: Plume.Google Scholar
  19. Deloria, V. (2009). In P. J. Deloria & J. S. Bernstein (Eds.), C.G. Jung and the Sioux traditions: Dreams, visions, nature, and the primitive. New Orleans, LA: Spring Journal Books.Google Scholar
  20. Descartes, R. (1637/1994). A discourse on method: Meditations and principles. London: Everyman.Google Scholar
  21. Freire, P. (1998). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
  22. Freire, P. (2005). Teachers as cultural workers: Letters to those who dare teach. Bouldar, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  23. Freud, S. (1938/1995). In A. A. Brill (Ed. & Trans.), The basic writings of Sigmund Freud. New York: The Modern Library.Google Scholar
  24. Gardner, H. (2008). Five minds for the future. Boston: Harvard Business Press.Google Scholar
  25. Gee, J. P. (1990/2008). Social Linguistics and Literacies: Ideology in discourses (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  26. Giroux, H. (2009). Critical theory and educational practice. In A. Darder, M. Baltodano, & R. Torres (Eds.), The critical pedagogy reader (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  27. Good, R. (2005). Scientific and religious habits of mind: Irreconcilable tensions in the curriculum. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  28. Goodman, G. (2010). Coming to a critical constructivism: Roots and branches. In G. S. Goodman (Ed.), Educational psychology reader: The art and science of how people learn. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  29. Hankins, T. (1985). Science and the enlightenment. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Harlan, J., & Rivken, M. (2008). Sciences experiences for the early childhood years: An integrated affective approach (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.Google Scholar
  31. Hume, D. (1888/2003). A treatise of human nature. New York: Dover.Google Scholar
  32. Israel, J. (2002). Radical enlightenment: Philosophy and the making of modernity 1650–1750. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Israel, J. (2006). Enlightenment contested: philosophy, modernity, and the emancipation of man 1650–1752. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Jardine, D. (2010a). On the origins of constructivism: The Kantian ancestry of Jean Piaget’s genetic epistemology. In G. S. Goodman (Ed.), Educational psychology reader: The art and science of how people learn. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  35. Jardine, D. (2010b). Jean Piaget and the origins of intelligence: A return to “Life Itself.” In G. S. Goodman (Ed.), Educational psychology reader: The art and science of how people learn. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  36. Jung, C. G. (1971). Psychological types. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University press.Google Scholar
  37. Jung, C. G. (1983). Memories, dreams, reflections. London: Flamingo.Google Scholar
  38. Kant, I. (1995). What is enlightenment? In I. Kramnick (Ed.), The portable enlightenment reader. New York: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  39. Kincheloe, J. (1991). Teachers as researchers: Qualitative inquiry as a path to empowerment. New York: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  40. Kincheloe, J. (1993). Toward a critical politics of teacher thinking: Mapping the postmodern. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.Google Scholar
  41. Kincheloe, J. (2004a). Why a book on urban education? In S. Steinberg & J. L. Kincheloe (Eds.), 19 urban questions: Teaching in the city. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  42. Kincheloe, J. (2005). Critical constructivism primer. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  43. Kincheloe, J. (2008a). Critical pedagogy primer (2nd ed.). New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  44. Kincheloe, J. (2008b). Critical pedagogy and the knowledge wars of the twenty-first century. International Journal of Critical Pedagogy, 1(1).Google Scholar
  45. Llewellyn, D. (2002). Inquire within: Implementing inquiry-based science standards. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.Google Scholar
  46. Macedo, D., Dendrinos, B., & Gounari, P. (2003). The hegemony of English. Boulder, CO: Paradigm.Google Scholar
  47. Malott, C. (2008). A call to action: An introduction to education, philosophy and native North America. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  48. Malott, C. (2010a). Policy and research in education: A critical pedagogy for educational leadership. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  49. Malott, C., Waukau, L., & Waukau-Villagomez, L. (2009). Teaching native America across the curriculum: A critical inquiry. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  50. Marcuse, H. (1964). One-Dimensional man: Studies in the ideology of advanced industrial society. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  51. Mayer, S. J. (2010). Dewey’s dynamic integration of Vygotsky and Piaget. In G. S. Goodman (Ed.), Educational psychology reader: The art and science of how people learn. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  52. McNally, D. (2001). Bodies of meaning: Studies on language, labor, and liberation. Albany, NY: SUNY.Google Scholar
  53. Menchaca, M. (1997). Early racist discourse: The roots of deficit thinking. In R. Valencia (Ed.), The evolution of deficit thinking: Educational thought and practice. New York: Falmer.Google Scholar
  54. Moraes, M. (1996). Bilingual education: A dialogue with the Bakhtin circle. Albany, NY: SUNY.Google Scholar
  55. Newton, I. (1952/1987). Mathematical principles of natural philosophy. London: William Benton.Google Scholar
  56. Peterson, B. (2005). Teaching math across the curriculum. In E. Gutstein & B. Peterson (Eds.), Rethinking mathematics: Teaching social justice by the numbers. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools.Google Scholar
  57. Piaget, J. (1970). Science of education and the psychology of the child. New York: Orion Press.Google Scholar
  58. Piaget, J., & Bärbel, I. (1969). The psychology of the child. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  59. Pinar, W., Reynolds, W., Slattery, P., & Taubman, P. (2000). Understanding curriculum: An introduction to the study of historical and contemporary curriculum discourses. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  60. Popper, K. (1935/2007). The logic of scientific discovery. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  61. Roth, W. M., & Barton, A. C. (2004). Rethinking scientific literacy. New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Russell, B. (1945/1972). The history of western philosophy. New York: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
  63. Tashi Tsering, G. (2006). Buddhist psychology: The foundations of Buddhist thought: Volume 3. Boston: Wisdom Publications.Google Scholar
  64. Trawick-Smith, J. (2000). Early childhood development: A multicultural perspective (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.Google Scholar
  65. Vygotsky, L. (1962). Thought and language. London: The MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. London: Harvard University press.Google Scholar
  67. Wood, G. (2004). A view from the field: NCLB’s effects on classroom and schools. In D. Meier & G. Wood (Eds.), Many children left behind: How the no child left behind act is damaging our children and our schools. New York: Beacon.Google Scholar
  68. Wundt, W. (1902). Principles of physiological psychology (5th ed.). New York: The Macmillan Co.Google Scholar
  69. Chomsky, N. (2002). On nature and language. New York: Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Hedegaard, M. (1990). The zone of proximal development as basis for instruction. In L. C. Moll (Ed.), Vygotsky and education: Instructional implications and applications of sociohistorical psychology (pp. 349–371). New York: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  71. Maslow, A. (1968). Toward a psychology of being. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  72. Nisbett, R. (2009). Intelligence and how to get it: Why schools and cultures count. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  73. Plato. (2001). The republic. New York: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  74. Thorndike, E. (1910). Educational psychology. Albany, NY: Teachers College, Columbia University.Google Scholar
  75. Zimmer, C. (2007). Selections and commentary. In C. Darwin (Ed.), The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex: The Concise edition. New York: Plume.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Queens College/CUNYNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations