Developmental Language Disorders

Chapter

Abstract

Developmental language disorders can present either as primary or as secondary disorders, depending on whether they occur alone or concurrent with other neurodevelopmental disorders. This chapter outlines classifications, definitions, and clinical features of primary and secondary neurodevelopmental language disorders and provides an overview of approaches to diagnosis and treatment.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Reading Comprehension Learning Disability Language Impairment Specific Language Impairment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Greenspan SI, Wieder S. Infant and early childhood mental health: a comprehensive developmental approach to assessment and intervention. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2006.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Girolametto L, Wiigs M, Smyth R, Weitzman E, Pearce P. Children with a history of expressive vocabulary delay: Outcomes at 5 years of age. Am J Speech Lang Pathol. 2001;10:358–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Paul PV. First- and second-language English literacy. Volta Rev. 1996;98(2):5–16.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rescorla L. Language and reading outcomes at age 9 in late-talking toddlers. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2002;45:360–71.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rice ML, Taylor CL, Zubrick SR. Language outcomes of 7-year-old children with or without a history of late language emergence at 24-months. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2008;51:394–407.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rice ML, Warren SF. Introduction. In: Rice ML, Warren SF, editors. Developmental language disorders: From phenotypes to etiologies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 2004. pp. 1–3.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Law J, Garrett Z, Nye C. The efficacy of treatment for children with developmental speech and language delay/disorder: A meta-analysis. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2004;47:924–43.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Definitions of Communication Disorders and Variations [Relevant Paper]. Available from http://www.asha.org/policy. 1993.
  9. 9.
    Catts HW, Fey ME, Zhang X, Tomblin JB. Estimating the risk of future reading difficulties in kindergarten children: A research-based model and its clinical implementation. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2001;32:38–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tomblin JB, Zhang X, Weiss A, Catts H, Ellis WS. Dimensions of individual differences in communication skills among primary grade children. In: Rice ML, Warren SF, editors. Developmental language disorders: from phenotypes to etiologies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 2004. pp. 53–76.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Tomblin JB, Zhang X. Are children with SLI a unique group of language learners? In: Tager-Flusberg H, editor. Neurodevelopmental disorders: contributions to a new framework from the cognitive neurosciences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press; 1999. pp. 361–82.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 2000.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Conti-Ramsden G, Crutchly A, Botting N. The extent to which psychometric tests differentiate subgroups of children with SLI. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2003;40:765–77.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bishop DVM. Pragmatic language impairment: A correlate of SLI, a distinct subgroup, or part of the autistic continuum? In: Bishop DVM, Leonard LB, editors. Speech and language impairments in children: Causes, characteristics, intervention, and outcome. Hove: Psychology Press; 2000. pp. 99–113.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Bishop DVM, Norbury CF. Exploring the borderlands of autistic disorder and specific language impairment: A study using standardized diagnostic instruments. J Child Psychol Psychiatr. Allied Disciplines. 2002;43:917–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Bishop DVM, Adams C. Conversational characteristics of children with semantic-pragmatic disorder. 2. What features lead to a judgment of inappropriacy? Br J Disord Commun. 1989;24:241–63.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Tomblin JB, Zhang X, Weiss A, Catts H, Ellis WS. Dimensions of individual differences in communication skills among primary grade children. In: Rice ML, Warren SF, editors. Developmental language disorders: from phenotypes to etiologies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 2004. pp. 53–76.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Kirk SA. Educating exceptional children. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin; 1962.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. Pub. L. No. 108–446, 118 Stat. 2647. 2004.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Hallahan DP, Mock DR. A brief history of the field of learning disabilities. In: Swanson HL, Harris KR, Graham S, editors. Handbook of learning disabilities. New York, NY: Guilford; 2003. pp. 16–29.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Rourke BP. Syndrome of nonverbal learning disabilities. New York, NY: Guilford; 1995.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Fletcher H, Buckley S. Phonological awareness in children with Down syndrome. Down Syndr Res Pract. 2002;8(1):11–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Catts HW, Kamhi AG. Classification of reading disabilities. In: Catts HW, Kamhi AG, editors. Language and reading disabilities. 2nd ed. Boston, MA: Allyn Bacon; 2005. pp. 72–93.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Snowling MJ. Dyslexia. Oxford: Blackwell; 2000.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Kamhi AG. A meme’s eye view of speech-language pathology. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2004;35:105–11.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Snowling MJ. Phonological processing and developmental dyslexia. J Res Read. 1995;18(2):132–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Stanovich KE, Siegel LS. Phenotypic performance profile of children with reading disabilities: A regression-based test of the phonological-core variable-difference model. J Educ Psychol. 1994;86:24–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Aram D, Healy JM. Hyperlexia: A review of extraordinary word recognition. In: Obler LK, Fein D, editors. The exceptional brain: Neuropsychology of talent and special abilities. New York, NY: Guilford; 1988. pp. 70–102.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Catts HW, Hogan TP, Adlof SM. Developmental changes in reading and reading disabilities. In: Catts HW, Kamhi AG, editors. The connections between language and reading disabilities. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 2005. pp. 25–40.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Zubrick SR, Taylor CL, Rice ML, Slegers D. Late language emergence at 24 months: An epidemiological study of prevalence and covariates. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2007;50:1562–92.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Rice ML, Taylor CL, Zubrick SR. Language outcomes of 7-year-old children with or without a history of late language emergence at 24-months. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2008;51:394–407.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Tomblin JB, Records NL, Buckwalter P, Zhang X, Smith E, O’Brien M. Prevalence of specific language impairment in kindergarten children. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 1997;40:1245–60.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Rescorla L. Language and reading outcomes at age 9 in late-talking toddlers. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2002;45:360–71.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Scarborough HS, Dobrich W. Development of children with early language delays. J Speech Hear Res. 1990;33:70–83.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Mashburn AJ, Myers SS. Advancing research on children with speech-language impairment: An introduction to the early childhood longitudinal study – longitudinal cohort. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2010;41:61–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Kavale KA, Forness SR. Learning disability as a discipline. In: Swanson HL, Harris KR, Graham S, editors. Handbook of learning disabilities. New York, NY: Guilford; 2003. pp. 76–93.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Watt N, Wetherby A, Shumway S. Prelinguistic predictors of language outcome at three years of age. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2006;49:1224–37.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    Wetherby A, Goldstein H, Cleary J, Allen L, Kublin K. Early identification of children with communication delays: Concurrent and Predictive Validity of the CSBS Developmental Profile. Inf Young Child. 2003;16:161–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Fenson L, Marchman V, Thal D, Dale P, Reznick J, Bates E. MacArthur-Bates Communicative Developmental Inventories-second edition (CDIs). Baltimore, MD: Paul H Brookes; 2007.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Bricker D, Squires J. Ages and Stages Questionnaire: a parent-completed, child-monitoring system – second edition (ASQ). Baltimore, MD: Paul H Brookes; 1999.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Rossetti L. Rossetti Infant-Toddler Language Scale. East Moline, IL: LinguiSystems; 2005.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Data Analysis System (DANS), OMB #1820–0043: “Children with Disabilities Receiving Special Education Under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,” 2008. Data updated as of August 3, 2009. Data downloaded and summarized October 19, 2010 from http://https://www.ideadata.org/arc_toc10.asp#partbCC
  43. 43.
    Snow CE, Burns MS, Griffin P, editors. Preventing reading difficulties in young children. national research council, committee on the prevention of reading difficulties of young children. Washington, DC: Natl Acad Press; 1998.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Nelson NW. Language and literacy disorders: Infancy through adolescence. Boston, MA: Allyn Bacon/Pearson Education; 2010.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, PhD Program in Interdisciplinary Health SciencesWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

Personalised recommendations