Advertisement

Facticity and Transcendentalism: Husserl and the Problem of the “Geisteswissenschaften

  • Peter Reynaert
Chapter
Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 108)

Abstract

In my paper, I want to reflect on the validity of Husserl’s claim to have renewed the idea of transcendental philosophy, by identifying a new transcendentalArbeitsfeld”: constitution of reality by absolute, intentional consciousness. I will do this on the basis of his project to found the “Geisteswissenschaften”. In anti-naturalist vein, Husserl argued convincingly for the necessity of the human sciences on the basis of a regional ontology of the human lifeworld, which demands a proper approach, founded on a specific so-called personalistic attitude. Furthermore, a “geisteswissenschaftliche” psychology must uncover the constitution of culture by fundamental intentional processes, which are embedded in a social and historical context. I will present this analysis in the first part. In the second part, I will argue that this mundaneGeisteswissenschaft” is problematical for Husserl’s transcendental project, which basically claims that the “geistige Welt” is a correlate of transcendental consciousness. If it is possible to study the constitution of human reality in the natural attitude by studying the intentional activity of the human person in phenomenological psychology, which applies a non-transcendental phenomenological reduction, what extra knowledge can transcendental phenomenology impart? Husserl continued to struggle with this question, which is essentially the problem of the psychological version of the reduction, and which is highlighted by his remarks that there is no intrinsic difference between phenomenological psychology and transcendental phenomenology, with respect to the analysis of constitutive intentionality. The reason is that transcendental consciousness necessarily objectifies itself as factual human person, in order to perform its transcendental function.

Keywords

Intentional Object Cultural Science Transcendental Phenomenology Spiritual World Transcendental Philosophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. References to and citations of Husserl’s work are identified in the text and the notes by the page number(s) following the German Husserliana volume number, except for Erfahrung und Urteil and Formale und transzendentale Logik.Google Scholar
  2. Husserl, E. 1976. Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie, erstes Buch: Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie. In Husserliana Bd. 3–1, Hrsg. Schuhmann, K. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Ideen I)Google Scholar
  3. Husserl, E. 1952. Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie, zweites Buch: Phänomenologische Untersuchungen zur Konstitution. In Husserliana Bd. 4, Hrsg. Biemel, M. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Ideen II)Google Scholar
  4. Husserl, E. 1952. Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie, drittes Buch: Die Phänomenologie und die Fundamente der Wissenschaften. In Husserliana Bd. 5, Hrsg. Biemel, M. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Ideen III)Google Scholar
  5. Husserl, E. 1976. Die Krisis der europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie. In Husserliana Bd 6, Hrsg. Biemel, W. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Krisis)Google Scholar
  6. Husserl, E. 1959. Erste Philosophie (1923–1924), zweiter Teil: Theorie der phänomenologischen Reduktion. In Husserliana Bd. 8, Hrsg. Boehm, R. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (EPH II)Google Scholar
  7. Husserl, E. 1962. Phänomenologische Psychologie, Vorlesungen Sommersemester 1925, In Husserliana Bd. 9, Hrsg. Biemel, W. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  8. Husserl, E. 1973. Zur Phänomenologie der Intersubjektivität, erster Teil: 1905–1920. In Husserliana Bd. 13, Hrsg. Kern, I. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Intersubjektivität I, IS I)Google Scholar
  9. Husserl, E. 1973. Zur Phänomenologie der Intersubjektivität, zweiter Teil: 1921–1928. In Husserliana Bd. 14, Hrsg. Kern, I. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Intersubjektivität II, IS II)Google Scholar
  10. Husserl, E. 1973. Zur Phänomenologie der Intersubjektivität, dritter Teil: 1929–1935. In Husserliana Bd. 15, Hrsg. Kern, I. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff. (Intersubjektivität III, IS III)Google Scholar
  11. Husserl, E. 1981. Formale und transzendentale Logik (FTL). Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag.Google Scholar
  12. Husserl, E. 1985. Erfahrung und Urteil (EU). Hamburg: F.Meiner.Google Scholar
  13. Husserl, E. 1993. Die Krisis der europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie. Ergänzungsband. Texte aus dem Nachlass 1934–1937. In Husserliana Bd. 29, Hrsg. Smid, R.N. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  14. Husserl, E. 1996. Logik und allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie: Vorlesungen Wintersemester 1917/18. Mit ergänzenden Texten aus der ersten Fassung von 1910/11. In Husserliana Bd. 30, Hrsg. Panzer, U. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Husserl, E. 2002. Natur und Geist: Vorlesungen Sommersemester 1919. In Materialien Band 4, Hrsg. Weiler, M. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar

Other Works

  1. Dilthey, W. 1968. Der Aufbau der geschichtlichen Welt in den Geisteswissenschaften. In Gesammelte Schriften, Bd.7. Stuttgart: Teubner.Google Scholar
  2. Merleau-Ponty, M. 1945. Phénoménologie de la Perception. Paris: Gallimard.Google Scholar
  3. Reynaert, P. 2000. Husserl’s phenomenology of Animate being and the critique of naturalism. In Phänomenologische Forschungen: neue Folge 2, 251–269.Google Scholar
  4. Van Kerckhoven, G. 1984. Die Grundansätze von Husserls Konfrontation mit Dilthey im Lichte der geschichtlichen Selbstzeugnisse. In Phänomenologische Forschungen, 16, Hrsg. Orth, E.W. Freiburg/München: Alber.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium

Personalised recommendations