Which Transcedentalism? Many Faces of Husserlian Transcedentalism

Chapter
Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 108)

Abstract

Edmund Husserl called his philosophy “transcendental phenomenology” repeatedly. Nevertheless, within his project the concept of transcendentalism seems to be ambiguous and indefinite. The essay argues that one is confronted with few concepts of transcendentalism within phenomenology: the static, genetic, and practical approach. In contrast to phenomenologists who stress only one form of Husserl’s transcendentalism, the essay asserts that the introduction of the three concepts to phenomenological investigations significantly broadens the original understanding of phenomenology as defined in Ideas I. Moreover, it is claimed here that Husserl’s and Eugen Fink’s research on transcendentalism is characterized as a process of immanent development from static descriptions of human cognition to the thesis about a practical dimension of communal researches.

Keywords

Transcendental Phenomenology Practical Dimension Transcendental Idealism Phenomenological Investigation Cartesian Meditation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GdańskGdańskPoland

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