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Developments in Decontamination Technologies of Military Personnel and Equipment

  • Utkarsh R. Sata
  • Seshadri S. Ramkumar
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

Abstract

Individual protection is important for warfighters, first responders and civilians to meet the current threat of toxic chemicals and chemical warfare (CW) agents. Within the realm of individual protection, decontamination of warfare agents is not only required on the battlefield but also in laboratory, pilot plants, production and agent destruction sites. It is of high importance to evaluate various decontaminants and decontamination techniques for implementing the best practices in varying scenarios such as decontamination of personnel, sites and sensitive equipment.

This chapter discusses decontamination technologies such as adsorptive carbon and enzymes, and highlights recent developments such as reactive skin decontamination lotion and Low-cost Personal Decontamination System (LPDS). Decontamination using solvent and non-solvent based systems is an important countermeasures strategy adopted by military, first responders and emergency personnel to sustain their operational capability and prevent additional contamination.

Keywords

Military Personnel Personal Protective Equipment Nerve Agent Sulfur Mustard Chemical Warfare Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Glossary

AChE

Acetylcholinesterase

AgY

Silver Exchanged Zeolite

BChE

Butyrylcholinesterase

CBRN

Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear

ChemBio

Chemical and Biological

CW

Chemical Warfare

DEPPT

O,S-diethyl phenylphosphonothioate

DS2

Decontamination Solution 2

GB

Soman

GD

Sarin

HD

Sulfur Mustard

HFEs

Hydrofluoroethers

LPDS

Low-cost Personal Decontamination System

NaY

Sodium Zeolite

OPA

Organophosphorous Acid

OPs

Organophosphate compounds

PPE

Personal Protective Equipment

RSDL

Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion

T2 toxin

Trichothecene Mycotoxin

UV

Ultraviolet

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nonwovens and Advanced Materials LaboratoryTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA

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