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Leadership Preparation for Culturally Diverse Schools in Cyprus, Norway, and the United States

  • Lauri Johnson
  • Jorunn Møller
  • Eli Ottesen
  • Petros Pashiardis
  • Vassos Savvides
  • Gunn Vedøy
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter surveys the professional development of principals in Cyprus , Norway , and the United States with a particular focus on how cultural diversity issues are addressed in leadership preparation programs. Our analysis indicates that principal preparation (particularly preparation for diverse schools) varies in scope, organization, and approach across these three countries, ranging from a highly centralized system where a handful of in-service courses are offered by the Ministry of Education after appointment as a school leader (Cyprus ); to a proposed national system of university-based courses (Norway ); and finally wide-ranging university-based programs with increasing theoretical work on equity and social justice issues but a paucity of well-researched models (USA). We recommend the development of contextually specific leadership preparation programs to help aspiring school leaders learn to be culturally responsive and demonstrate strong advocacy for students, parents, and communities who have been marginalized.

Keywords

School Leader Preparation Program Multicultural Education Leadership Practice Ethnic Minority Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauri Johnson
    • 1
  • Jorunn Møller
    • 2
  • Eli Ottesen
    • 2
  • Petros Pashiardis
    • 3
  • Vassos Savvides
    • 3
  • Gunn Vedøy
    • 2
  1. 1.Boston CollegeChestnut HillUSA
  2. 2.University of OsloOsloNorway
  3. 3.Open University of CyprusNicosiaCyprus

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