Advertisement

Hebrew Language in Israel and the Diaspora

  • Nava Nevo
  • Daniel Verbov
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Religion and Education book series (IHRE, volume 5)

Abstract

This chapter examines the state of Hebrew today, both in Israel and in Diaspora communities, and discusses challenges facing those who are involved with the language. As a first language in Israel, Hebrew is undergoing changes due to globalization processes which cause some to express concern for its fate. As a second language, Hebrew is taught to immigrants and to minority groups with the intent of facilitating their integration into the life of the country; unfortunately, recognition of teaching Hebrew to immigrant students as a particular profession is still needed.

Keywords

Foreign Language Jewish Community Jewish Identity Immigrant Student Jewish People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Bekerman, Z. (1999). The Hebrew language: A constructive language for Jewishness sometimes private. In D. Zisenwein & D. Schers (Eds.), Present and future: Jewish culture, identity and language (pp. 101–124). Tel Aviv: School of Education, Tel Aviv University.Google Scholar
  2. Ben-Peretz, M. (1995). Patterns of teacher intervention in curricula activity. In M. Ben-Peretz (Ed.), The teacher and the curriculum (Chapter 1). Jerusalem: Ministry of Education and Culture, Section for Training Teaching Employees and the Mofet Institute (Heb.).Google Scholar
  3. Ben-Rafael, E. (2003). A national and multilingual language in globalization conditions and a multi-cultural society. Hed Ha-Ulpan He-Chadash, 85, 49–56 (Heb.).Google Scholar
  4. Berdichevsky, N. (1998). Why Hebrew? Hebrew Higher Education, 9, 37–56.Google Scholar
  5. Blum-Kulka, S. (2007). Teaching Hebrew as first and second language: Two curricula. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 117–131). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  6. Bouganim, A. (2007). Hebrew in the era of globalization. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 193–199). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  7. Brosh, H. (1996). Hebrew language diffusion through schools and universities in America. Journal of Jewish Education, 62(3), 13–20.Google Scholar
  8. Brosh-Weitz, S. (2007). The state of literacy in Israel. Tel-Aviv: Tel-Aviv University Ramot (Heb.).Google Scholar
  9. Deitcher, H. (2007). “We were as dreamers”: The impact of the communal milieu on the place of Hebrew in Diaspora Jewish education. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 105–114, 201 Heb. Abstract). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University.Google Scholar
  10. Deitcher, H. (2008). Jewish education in a global world: Challenges and opportunities. In S. Della Pergola, A. Bargil, & A. Yovel (Eds.), The President’s study forum on world Jewish affairs (series C, 2004–2007, pp. 115–130). Jerusalem: Publishing House of the World Zionist Organization and the Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Heb.).Google Scholar
  11. Elyagon-Rose, T. (1989). The sleeping princess. In Hebrew: A language like that: Stories by Talma Elyagon-Rose (pp. 32–35). Tel-Aviv: Kinneret Publishing House (Heb.).Google Scholar
  12. Ganiel, D. (2007). Illuminations on difficulties and challenges in teaching Hebrew as an additional language. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 203–205). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  13. Greenberg, M. (1990). On teaching the Bible. In H. Deitcher & A. J. Tannenbaum (Eds.), Studies in Jewish education (Vol. V, pp. 27–34). Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, the Hebrew University.Google Scholar
  14. Haramati, S. (2000). Hebrew is a spoken language. Tel-Aviv: Ministry of Defense Publications (Heb.).Google Scholar
  15. Levin, T., Shohamy, E., & Inbar, O. (2007). Achievements in academic Hebrew among immigrant students in Israel. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 37–66). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University.Google Scholar
  16. Ma’ariv. (2008, summer). Culture.Google Scholar
  17. Mintz, A. (2002). Hebrew in America: A position paper for the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture. Jewish Theological Seminary.Google Scholar
  18. Morhag, G. (1999/2000). Hebrew: A language of identity. Journal of Jewish Education, 65(3), 9–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Nevo, N., & Olshtain, E. (2007). Bilingualism: Benefits and risks. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 95–117). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  20. Ofek, A. (1996). The making of a Hebrew teacher: Preparing Hebrew teachers for Jewish schools. Journal of Jewish Education, 62(3), 21–28.Google Scholar
  21. Rodman, P. (2003). Israel and the place of modern Hebrew in Jewish education worldwide: A consultation about the possibilities for Hebrew language instruction, report submitted to the Research and Development Unit, Department of Jewish Zionist Education, the Jewish Agency, pp. 1–26.Google Scholar
  22. Rosenthal, R. (2007). On the future of Hebrew: Five areas of concern. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 179–191). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  23. Schachter, L., & Ofek, A. (2008). Hebrew language instruction. In P. A. Flexner & L. D. Bloomberg (Eds.), What we now know about Jewish education (pp. 271–282). Los Angeles: Torah Aura Publications.Google Scholar
  24. Schenker, A. (1991). The Hebrew consciousness amongst the Jewish people in our times. In T. Gur-Arieh (Ed.), The 8th Hebrew Scientific European Congress, organized by Universidad de Barcelona facultat de filologia and Brit Ivrit Olamit (pp. 184–187). Jerusalem: Brit Ivrit Olamit (Heb.).Google Scholar
  25. Schiff, A. (1999). Hebrew in the new world: Achievements and obstacles, problems and challenges. Hed Ha-Ulpan He-Chadash, 78, 79–85 (Heb.).Google Scholar
  26. Schwarzwald, O. (2005). The language is a reflection of the generation—On the relationship between aspects of society and aspects of the Hebrew language. Panim, 33, 4–14 (Heb.).Google Scholar
  27. Schwarzwald, O. (2007). Trends in modern Hebrew. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 59–81). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  28. Schweid, A. (2004). Culture, community and the continuity of the Jewish people in our times. In S. Della Pergola & A. Yovel (Eds.), The President’s study forum on world Jewish affairs (Series A, pp. 119–136). Jerusalem: Publishing House of the World Zionist Organization and the Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar
  29. Segev, T. (2007, December 21). The essence of the Israeli identity. Ha’aretz, p. 10 (Heb.).Google Scholar
  30. Shamosh, A. (1979). Vignettes of elementary school, in the story anthology Calamus and Cinnamon. Ramat-Gan: Massada Press Ltd. (Heb.).Google Scholar
  31. Shohamy, E. (1989). The Hebrew curriculum in Jewish schools. In E. Olshtain, D. Zisenwein, & E. Shohamy (Eds.), Hebrew as a unifying force in Diaspora Jewish education (pp. 45–54). Tel Aviv: University Enterprises for Publication (Heb.).Google Scholar
  32. Shohamy, E. (1999). Language and identity of Jews in Israel and in the Diaspora. In D. Zisenwein & D. Schers (Eds.), Present and future: Jewish culture, identity and language (pp. 79–99). Tel Aviv: School of Education, Tel Aviv University.Google Scholar
  33. Spolsky, B., & Shohamy, E. (1999). The languages of Israel. Clevedon, Buffalo, NY, Toronto and Sydney: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  34. Spolsky, B., Shohamy, E., & Nevo, N. (1995). A profile of teaching Hebrew as a second language to adult immigrants. Bar-Ilan University, the Center for Linguistic Policy Research, Reports and Position Papers.Google Scholar
  35. Steinberg, S. (1997). Hebrew: The hallmark of an educated Jew. Jewish Education News, 18(3), 10–11.Google Scholar
  36. Vorgan, Y. (2008, January 6). Document submitted to the Education, Culture and Sport Committee on the state of Hebrew in the education system, pp. 1–9 (Heb.).Google Scholar
  37. Wated, A. (2007). A new educational program: “Hebrew as a second language in Arab schools in Israel”. In N. Nevo & E. Olshtain (Eds.), The Hebrew language in the era of globalization (pp. 171–177). Studies in Jewish Education, Vol. XII. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, the Hebrew University (Heb.).Google Scholar
  38. Waxman, Ch. I. (1999). Language and identity among America’s Jews. In D. Zisenwein & D. Schers (Eds.), Present and future: Jewish culture, identity and language (pp. 63–74). Tel Aviv: School of Education, Tel Aviv University.Google Scholar
  39. Zisenwein, D. (1997). Teaching Hebrew: A suggestion for Hebrew educators. Religious Education, 92(1), 55–60.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

Personalised recommendations