Reflections on Networking and Collaboration

  • Daniel Muijs
  • Mel Ainscow
  • Chris Chapman
  • Mel West
Chapter

Abstract

The UK government, along with other Western governments, has argued that the raising of standards must also promote equity: that the emphasis on raising attainment must not simply benefit children who are already performing at a high level.

Keywords

Social Capital School Staff Collaborative Practice Head Teacher Leadership Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ainscow, M., Booth, T., & Dyson, A. (2006). Inclusion and the standards agenda: Negotiating policy pressures in England. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 10(4–5), 295–308.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fielding, M. (1999). Radical collegiality: Affirming teaching as an inclusive professional practice. Australian Educational Researcher, 26(2), 1–34.Google Scholar
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  4. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. West, M., Ainscow, M., & Stanford, J. (2005). Sustaining improvement in schools in challenging circumstances: A study of successful practice. School Leadership and Management, 25(1): 77–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hargreaves, D. H. (2003b). Education epidemic: Transforming secondary schools through innovation networks. London: Demos.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Muijs
    • 1
  • Mel Ainscow
    • 2
  • Chris Chapman
    • 2
  • Mel West
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Southampton, School of EducationSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.University of Manchester, School of EducationManchesterUK

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