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Genomics, Obesity and Enhancement

  • Maartje SchermerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The International Library of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics book series (LEAF, volume 18)

Abstract

Research in genomics, at least in the popular image, holds the promise of great things to come – not only cures for diseases but perhaps also possibilities to improve and refine ourselves. The debate in bioethics on such possibilities, that have come to be known as ‘enhancement’, has been going on for almost a decade. Developments in genetic knowledge and techniques form an important impetus for this debate. In this contribution I intend to provide an overview of the widely diverging moral questions that the subject of enhancement can raise when related to obesity and genomics.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Social Pressure Obese People Ethical Discussion Moral Question 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical Ethics and Philosophy of MedicineErasmus University Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands

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