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The Rome Statute: Codification of the Crime

  • Julie McBrideEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The contribution of the Rome Statute to the development of the crime of child soldier recruitment cannot be understated as it marks the definitive codification and official criminalisation of the crime. The chapter begins with a brief introduction to the drafting process of the Rome Statute and the Elements of Crimes, including the role played by non-governmental organisations. The decision to include child soldier recruitment as a war crime will be assessed, before going on to examine the question of prosecuting child soldiers, an issue dealt with by excluding jurisdiction for those under eighteen. The actus reus of the crime will be analysed, before determining the mens rea in terms of Article 30 and the viability of the defence of mistake, both of law and of fact. The chapter concludes with a section on the modes of responsibility as outlined within the Statute.

Keywords

Armed Conflict International Criminal Court International Criminal Rome Statute International Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© T. M. C. Asser press, The Hague, The Netherlands, and the author 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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