The Role of Cambodian Civil Society in the Victim Participation Scheme of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Chapter

Abstract

One of the most interesting features of the ECCC is that it combines an extensive victim participation scheme with a collective reparations mandate. However, it has been a gradual learning curve for the ECCC to manage the participation of more than 8,000 victims in its proceedings. Benefiting from its in-country location, the ECCC has been able to rely on collaboration with relatively strong and proactive local civil society organisations. Working primarily at the intersection between the Court and society, these NGOs have assumed various roles in support of the ECCC’s victim participation process, some of which would more commonly fall within the responsibility of a court. This chapter explores the main roles Cambodian NGOs play in the ECCC’s victim participation scheme and draws some preliminary observations at a point where the Court has completed its first case and is in the midst of trial hearings in its second case.

Keywords

ECCC Victim participation Civil society NGOs Hybrid courts Transitional justice 

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. ASSER PRESS, The Hague, The Netherlands, and the authors 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Asian International Justice InitiativeEast–West Center and UC Berkeley’s War Crimes Studies CenterHonoluluUSA

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