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Green War: An Assessment of the Environmental Law of International Armed Conflict

  • Michael N. SchmittEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

During the First Gulf War of 1990–1991, Iraqi forces engaged in activities, including dumping oil into the Persian Gulf and igniting Kuwaiti oil wells, which drew global attention to the environmental consequences of warfare. This chapter identifies and assesses the international legal regime governing the environmental impact of armed conflict. It begins with an examination of the historical record of environmental damage during warfare. The prescriptive norms—including peacetime, customary and treaty prescriptions—governing such damage are next catalogued and analyzed. Concluding that the existing law fails to adequately address environmental consequences that result from hostilities, the author suggests how the international community should respond to its shortcomings.

Keywords

Supra Note Armed Conflict Geneva Convention Vienna Convention Chemical Weapon Convention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Abbreviations

DOD

Department of Defense

ENMOD

Convention on the prohibition of military or any other hostile use of environmental modification techniques convention

ICEL

International Council of Environmental Law

ICRC

International Committee of the Red Cross

ILC

International Law Commission

LOS

Law of the Sea

MOOTW

Military operations other than war

NATO

North Atlantic treaty organization

NCA

National command authority

NSD

National Security Directive

OSD

Office of the Secretary of Defense

ROPME

Regional Organization for the Protection of the Marine Environment

SAM

Surface-to-air missiles

U.S.

United States of America

UNCED

United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development

UNEP

United Nations Environment Programme

UXO

Unexploded ordnance

WMD

Weapons of mass destruction

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. ASSER PRESS, The Hague, The Netherlands, and the authors 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.United States Naval War CollegeNewportUSA

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