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Indigenous Claims and Rights Under African Regional Institutions

  • Felix Mukwiza Ndahinda
Chapter

Abstract

The preceding chapters have discursively explored the relatively recent identification of numerous hunter-gatherers and pastoralists as indigenous peoples of Africa under the meaning attributable to this international legal category. The present chapter intends to explore whether and how African political and legal regional bodies accommodate indigenous rights. Since indigenousness is a product of relatively recent developments, the analysis will look at how existing instruments and new dynamics cover the substantive claims for special protection of indigenous rights. The discussion will attempt to examine the possible relevance of the work of African political institutions for indigenous right but, more particularly, focus on human and peoples’ rights bodies.

Keywords

Corporate Governance Indigenous People African State Territorial Integrity Advisory Opinion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© T.M.C.ASSER PRESS and the author 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Victimology Institute Tilburg, Tilburg UniversityTilburgThe Netherlands

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