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Adult Mortality in Asia

  • Zhongwei Zhao
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Population book series (IHOP, volume 2)

Abstract

Asia, the largest and most populous continent in the world, has experienced a rapid demographic transition since the end of World War II. According to a recent estimate by the United Nations Population Division (UN Population Division 2009), between 1950–1955 and 2005–2010 life expectancy at birth in Asia has increased from 41 to 69 years and the total fertility rate has fallen from 5.7 to 2.4 children per woman. Largely driven by these changes, Asia’s population size has nearly tripled. More than four billion people, accounting for 60% of the world total, now live in some 50 countries and areas in Asia (UN Population Division 2009).

Keywords

Asian Population Adult Mortality Mortality Decline Epidemiological Transition Noncommunicable Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The author would like to thank the WHO and the UN Population Division for providing detailed mortality data for this chapter, Pfizer and University of Cambridge for providing partial support to this research and Mie Inoue, Yohannes Kinfu, François Pelletier, and Jiaying Zhao for their help and support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Demographic and Social Research Institute, Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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