Coding and Classifying Causes of Death: Trends and International Differences

Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Population book series (IHOP, volume 2)

Abstract

Accurate, comparable, and timely cause-of-death information is important for assessing population health and for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public-health strategies. Unfortunately, these criteria are not always met. Researchers need a clear understanding of how cause-of-death data are collected, classified and coded, and presented. Variations and changes in process and procedures can result in sometimes serious comparability problems and can dramatically affect the interpretation of national trends and international comparisons. This chapter provides an overview of the major issues related to the collection, classification, and coding of cause-specific mortality and how these issues relate to the analysis of cause-specific mortality trends and international comparisons.

Keywords

Death Certificate Verbal Autopsy Comparability Ratio Civil Registration System Sample Registration System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mortality Statistics Branch, Division of Vital StatisticsNational Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionHyattsvilleUSA

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