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Resilience and Transformation in the Red Zone

  • Keith G. Tidball
  • Marianne E. Krasny
Chapter

Abstract

Although not generally recognized in policy and research agendas, cases where humans who face disaster, conflict, or stress turn to greening as a source of resilience abound. Such examples cut across organizational scales, as demonstrated by the greening efforts of individuals and of groups of youth and adults who plant gardens and trees under the harshest of conditions, including during war, in communities approaching a threshold and at risk of becoming what Norton has referred to as ‘feral cities’, in refugee camps, in small villages, and in major cities. In some instances greening may have symbolic meaning and broad implications for the resilience of entire nation-states. We provide a brief overview of the term resilience as it has been used at the individual level and then go into more depth regarding its use at the scale of social-ecological systems, with particular reference to crisis settings that open up possibilities for transformation to more desirable states. Whereas we recognize the well-documented role of greening in adaptation to ongoing, relatively small changes at the individual level, we focus on how greening comes to the fore when social-ecological systems – a village, a city, a region dependent on a particular natural resource, or even a whole nation-state – undergo transformations following a major perturbation.

Keywords

Resilience Transformation Greening in the red zone Disaster Conflict 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank colleagues at the Resilience Alliance, and the Stockholm Resilience Center, with particular gratitude to Charles Redman for many helpful conversations, Lance Gunderson for encouragement to pursue Greening in the Red Zone in resilience thinking contexts, and Thomas Elmqvist for much support, including a helpful review of this chapter.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Civic Ecology Lab, Department of Natural ResourcesCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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