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Reforestation and Farmers

  • David Lamb
Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 8)

Abstract

In the past many farmers have grown trees on their land using some form of agro forestry. These have been mostly grown for domestic uses. But the recent decline in the area of natural forests has meant the demand for forest products has increased and there is increasing scope for farmers to grow trees and sell timber and other forest products, especially on land that might be marginal for agriculture. The way in which this is done will be different to those earlier forms of smallholder tree-growing and so represents a new form of land use practice.

Keywords

Degraded Land Timber Tree Farm Forestry Reforestation Program Timber Plantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Mined Land RehabilitationUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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