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A Region of Contrasts: Urban Development, Housing and Poverty in Asia

  • Kioe Sheng Yap
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past few decades, Asia has made headlines around the world as the region with the fastest economic growth, the economic powerhouse of the world, the ­saviour of the global economy in times of financial crises, etc. However, Asia is a vast region with an enormous diversity, deep contrasts and wide disparities: rapid economic growth, extreme poverty, both affecting large numbers of people. The dimensions of these contrasts and disparities become particularly visible within the context of urban development, housing and poverty.

Keywords

Informal Sector Informal Settlement Civil Society Organization Urban Poor Urban Migration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BangkokThailand

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