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Natural Elements and Physical Activity in Urban Green Space Planning and Design

Abstract

While studies on physical activity behavior are widely available, research on physical activity environments is relatively new, particularly when related to ‘natural’ environments. In this chapter planning issues and design elements that can influence the use of urban green areas for physical activity are discussed. Availability, features, conditions, safety, aesthetics and climatic comfort are the main ­characteristics of urban green areas considered in the discussion, particularly in relation to natural elements. In the first part of the chapter the current literature presenting scientific evidence is examined. Once this evidence is discussed examples of best practices and significant planning and design solutions concerning the most relevant attributes of the green spaces are presented.

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Green Space
  • Urban Forest
  • Urban Park
  • Urban Green Space

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Semenzato, P., Sievänen, T., de Oliveira, E.S., Soares, A.L., Spaeth, R. (2011). Natural Elements and Physical Activity in Urban Green Space Planning and Design. In: , et al. Forests, Trees and Human Health. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-9806-1_9

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