Global Bioethics and Natural Law

Chapter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 110)

Abstract

Proponents of global ethics frameworks seek to identify universally applicable, knowable and enforceable moral obligations and standards. Many of these are grounded in particular conceptions of human rights and seek to secure positive obligations to respect such rights. In bioethics there has been a special emphasis on global ethics. This is reflected in declarations and codes of ethics (World Medical Association, 1975, 1983, 1989, 1996, 2000, 2002, and 2004; UNESCO, 2005; Council of Europe, 1997) as well as in the bioethics literature, where some have challenged the plausibility of a global bioethics (Engelhardt, 2005; Cherry, 2002).

Keywords

Basic Good Moral Norm Moral Knowledge Shared Norm Moral Conviction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. tan Alora, A. 2001. Honesty, loyalty, and cheating. In tan Alora and J. Lumitao (Eds.) beyond a Western bioethics: Voices from the developing world 60–66. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bole, T.J. 2004. The perversity of Thomistic Natural Law theory: Reflections on Lustig’s criticisms. In Natural Law and the possibility of a global bioethics ed. M.J. Cherry, 141–147. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer academic.Google Scholar
  3. Boyle, J. 1980. Contraception and Natural Family Planning, International Review of Natural Family Planning 4:309–315.Google Scholar
  4. Boyle, J. 2004. Natural Law and global ethics. Natural Law and the possibility of a global ethics ed. M.J. Cherry, 1–15. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer academic.Google Scholar
  5. Boyle, J. 2006. The bioethics of global biomedicine: A Natural Law reflection. In Global bioethics: The collapse of consensus ed. H.T. Engelhardt, Jr, 300–334. Salem, MA: M&M Scrivener Press.Google Scholar
  6. Cherry, M.J. 2002. The search for a global bioethics: Fraudulent claims and false promises. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27:683–698.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Cherry, M.J. 2004. Natural Law and moral pluralism. In Natural Law and the possibility of a global ethics ed. M.J. Cherry, 17–38. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer academic.Google Scholar
  8. Council of Europe 1997. Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and dignity of the human being with regard to the application of biology and medicine: Convention on Human Rights and biomedicine. Oviedo. http://conventions.coe.int/treaty/en/treaties/html/164.htm (Accessed July 5, 2007)
  9. DuBois J.M. 2006. How much guidance can a secular, natural law ethic offer? In The death of metaphysics; the death of culture: epistemology, metaphysics, and moralityed. M.J. Cherry, 185–197. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.Google Scholar
  10. Engelhardt, H.T., Jr. 1996. The foundations of bioethics, 2nd edition. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Engelhardt, H.T., Jr. 2000. The foundations of Christian bioethics. Lisse, the Netherlands: Swets and Zeitlinger.Google Scholar
  12. Engelhardt, H.T., Jr. 2005. Critical care: Why there is no global bioethics. Current Opinion in Critical Care 11:605–609.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Engelhardt, H.T., Jr. 2006. The search for a global morality: Bioethics, the culture wars and moral diversity. In Global bioethics: The collapse of consensus ed. H. T. Engelhardt, Jr. 18–49. Salem, MA: M&M Scrivener Press.Google Scholar
  14. Fan, R. 1997. Self-determination vs. Family-determination: Two incommensurable principles of autonomy. Bioethics 11:309–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Finnis, J. 1980. Natural Law and Natural Rights. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  16. Finnis, J. 1983. Fundamentals of ethics. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Finnis, J. 1991. Moral absolutes: Tradition, revision, and truth. Washington, DC: Catholic University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Finnis, J., J. Boyle, and G. Grisez. 2001. Nuclear deterrence, morality and realism. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Grisez, G. 1983, 1993, 1997. The way of the Lord Jesus: Volumes 1–3. Quincy, IL: Franciscan Press.Google Scholar
  20. Grisez, G., J. Boyle, J. Finnis, and W.E. May. 1988. Every marital act ought to be open to new life: Toward a clearer understanding, The Thomist 52:365–426.Google Scholar
  21. Grisez, G., J. Finnis, and J. Boyle. 1987. Practical principles, moral truth, and ultimate ends. The American Journal of Jurisprudence 32:99–151.Google Scholar
  22. Fox, R.M. and J. DeMarco. 1993. The immorality of promising. Journal of Value Inquiry 27:81–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hisrick, R., Bucar, B., and S. Oztark. 2003. A cross-cultural comparison of business ethics: Cases of Russia, Slovenia, Turkey, and United States. Cross Cultural Management 10:3–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Iltis, A. 2004. An assessment of the requirements of the study of Natural Law. In Natural Law and the possibility of a global ethics ed. M.J. Cherry, 115–122. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer academic.Google Scholar
  25. McInerny, D. 2004. Natural Law and conflict. In Natural Law and the possibility of a global bioethics ed. M.J. Cherry, 89–100. Dordrecth, The Netherlands: Kluwer academic.Google Scholar
  26. Moon, C. and P. Woolliams. 2000. Managing cross cultural business ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 27:105–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Pius XII 1958. The prolongation of life: Allocution to the international congress of Anesthesiologist – November 24, 1957. The Pope Speaks 4:395–396.Google Scholar
  28. Schloendorff v. Society of New York Hospital 211 N.Y. 125, 105 N.E. 92 (1914).Google Scholar
  29. UNESCO 2005. Universal declaration on bioethics and Human Rights. http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=31058&URL_;DO=DO_TOPIC&_SECTION=201.html (Accessed July 5, 2007).
  30. World Medical Association 1975, 1983, 1989, 1996, 2000, 2002, and 2004. Declaration of Helsinki. http://www.wma.net/e/policy/b3.htm. (Accessed July 5, 2007).

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Bioethics, Health and SocietyWake Forest UniversityWinston-SalemNCUSA

Personalised recommendations