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Potential Role of Salt Marshes in the Sabkhas of Egypt

  • Hassan M. El Shaer
Chapter
Part of the Tasks for Vegetation Science book series (TAVS, volume 46)

Abstract

Salinization is one of the major problems for food production in Egypt. It has significantly impaired agricultural productivity. The total area of salt affected soils is estimated to be 1.8 million ha. These are mainly located along the Red sea coast, in the Mediterranean part, some areas in middle, western and eastern parts of the Nile delta, El Fayoum, Wadi El Natroun and the Oasis in the western desert area. Out of these saline areas salt marshes are important habitats for grazing animals, waterfowl and fish. They are integral components of the coastal and inland ecosystems of the country with a great potential as a source for many raw materials like food for human, animal feeds, fiber materials, habitat for fish, insects,etc.). However these habitats are under threat due to the uncontrolled human and orther biotic interferences. An attempt will be made here to give some evaluations on these salt marshes and their potential role in the Sabkhas of Egypt.

Keywords

Salt Marsh Western Desert Reed Swamp Halocnemum Strobilaceum Arthrocnemum Macrostachyum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Desert Research CenterCairoEgypt

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