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Selecting Admixtures to Achieve Application-Required Rheology

  • Eric Koehler
  • Ara Jeknavorian
  • Stephen Klaus
Conference paper
Part of the RILEM Bookseries book series (RILEM, volume 1)

Abstract

SCC can encompass a wide range of concrete rheology. Previous research has shown the importance of specific rheological characteristics for application requirements such as reduced formwork pressure, increased static and dynamic segregation resistance, and increased pumpability. The required rheological characteristics for different applications are discussed in terms of yield stress, plastic viscosity, and thixotropy. Micromortar rheology measurements were conducted with four different high-range water reducers (HRWR) and two different water/cement ratios to demonstrate potential differences in rheology due to HRWR selection. The results indicated that HRWR selection can significantly impact micromortar rheology.

Keywords

Shear Rate Cement Particle Plastic Viscosity Mixture Proportion Dynamic Yield Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Koehler
    • 1
  • Ara Jeknavorian
    • 1
  • Stephen Klaus
    • 1
  1. 1.W.R. Grace & CoCambridgeUSA

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