The Effect of Employment on the Quality of Life of People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 41)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the literature in relation to the effect that employment and method of employment has on the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities. The chapter first summarizes the literature on whether employment affects the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities, and then reports those papers that investigate whether differences exist in the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities employed in sheltered employment compared with open employment. The chapter concludes with a call for more research in the area, specifically highlighting gaps in our current knowledge and identifying areas worthy of future research on this matter.

Keywords

Employment Intellectual disability Open employment Quality of life Sheltered employment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Accounting and FinanceMonash UniversityCaulfield EastAustralia

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