Aspects of Quality of Life for Children with a Disability in Inclusive Schools

Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 41)

Abstract

Quality of life for children with a disability is important to their sense of self-worth and their development but has not often been the focus of study. Some aspects of children’s quality of life are dependent upon their family’s quality life – others relate to the individual and their everyday activities, and are worthy of separate consideration. This chapter discusses the results of an inquiry into the ordinary lives of children with a disability who attended inclusive schools. A quality of life framework was used to guide the inquiry and subsequently analyze the findings. A personal account of the children’s experiences at school, home, and in the community was provided by the children themselves and their parents through interviews. The quality of life of these children appeared rich, and the circumstances that enhanced their lives are discussed.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Down Syndrome Intellectual Disability Emotional Wellbeing Life Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Flinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia

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