Life Satisfaction for Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 41)

Abstract

The concepts of quality of life and life satisfaction are ubiquitous, complex and intertwined. But for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) – who by most measures have a very low quality of life – understanding, assessing and improving quality of life and life satisfaction are very problematic. The first author’s research, briefly described in this chapter, investigated the nature of life satisfaction for children with such disabilities. The primary findings are a grounded theory about the nature of life satisfaction for children with PIMD, and a grounded theory about how others can (best) come to know them. The authors believe that this life satisfaction can be discerned, that children with PIMD often experience a reasonable quality of life and that their life satisfaction and quality of life can be improved.

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Intellectual Disability Emotional Intelligence Communication Partner Preference Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of NewcastleNewcastleUK

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