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Global Vegetation Health: Long-Term Data Records

  • Felix KoganEmail author
  • Wei Guo
  • Aleksandar Jelenak
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

The new Global Vegetation Health (GVH) data set has been developed for operational and scientific purposes. The GVH has advantages before other long-term global data sets, being the longest (30-year), having the highest spatial resolution (4-km), containing, in addition to NDVI, data and products from infrared channels, originally observed reflectance/emission values, no-noise indices, biophysical climatology and what is the most important, products used for monitoring the environment and socioeconomic activities. The processed data and products are ready to be used without additional processing for monitoring, assessments and predictions in agriculture, forestry, climate change and forcing, health, invasive species, deceases, ecosystem addressing such topics as food security, land cover land change, climate change, environmental security and others.

Keywords

Vegetation health 30-year 4-km data records Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) Temperature Condition Index (TCI) and Vegetation health indices (VHI) NDVI and BT 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NESDIS/NOAA, Center for Satellite Application and Research (STAR)WashingtonUSA
  2. 2.IMSG Inc.WashingtonUSA
  3. 3.University Corporation for Atmospheric ResearchWashingtonUSA

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