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Mount Etna, Sicily: Landscape Evolution and Hazard Responses in the Pre-industrial Era

  • David K. ChesterEmail author
  • Angus M. Duncan
  • Peter A. James
Chapter

Abstract

Mount Etna dominates eastern Sicily, being over 3000 m in height and covering an area of some 1750 km2. Etna has instilled a sense of awe in men and women for thousands of years (Fig. 15.1); to voyagers in the Classical Age it was considered the highest point on Earth (King 1973a) and, even before the colonization of the island by the Greeks ca. 740 BC, members of Sicel culture were practicing cults that associated volcanism with subterranean processes (Chester et al. 2000).

Keywords

Lava Flow Lava Tube Flank Eruption Coastal Periphery Patron Saint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • David K. Chester
    • 1
    Email author
  • Angus M. Duncan
  • Peter A. James
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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