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Antarctica: The Continent

  • Gunter Faure
  • Teresa M. Mensing
Chapter

Abstract

The area of Antarctica is 13.97 × 106 km2 making it the fifth largest of the seven continents (Stonehouse 2002). It is conventionally oriented on maps as shown in Fig.2.1 and is subdivided into East Antarctica, West Antarctica, the Antarctic Peninsula, and certain islands that rise more than 500 m above sea level (i.e., Alexander, Bear, Berkner, Roosevelt, Ross, and Thurston). In addition, Antarctica is surrounded by the Ross, Ronne, Filchner, Riiser-Larsen, Fimbul, and Amery floating ice shelves as well as by the Larsen ice shelf located along the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Except for the northernmost tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, the continent lies within the Antarctic Circle at latitudes greater than 62.5° south.

Keywords

Antarctic Peninsula Ozone Hole Katabatic Wind Antarctic Treaty Transantarctic Mountain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Earth Sciences and Byrd Polar Research CenterThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.School of Earth Sciences and Byrd Polar Research CenterThe Ohio State UniversityMarionUSA

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