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Focusing and Phenomenology

  • Antonio Q. Zirión 
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 62)

Abstract

Husserl founded and developed transcendental phenomenology as an eidetic discipline. It arose, first from its subject matter, but in a decisive way from the scientific and rationalistic (philosophical) goals assigned to it. As to the former, the basic concepts of a science of what is a perpetual flux have to be concepts of types, not fixed or exact concepts as those of the natural sciences, because only they can ­capture the “pronounced conformity to type” of the flux of consciousness.

Keywords

Bodily Awareness Transcendental Phenomenology Intentional Analysis Subsidiary Instruction Husserlian Phenomenology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Seminario-Taller de Estudios y Proyectos de Fenomenologia HusserlianaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CoyoacánMéxicoMéxico
  2. 2.Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de HidalgoMoreliaMéxico

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