Direct Injection Sprayer

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes past and present direct injection systems (DIS). The systems are structured into central (CDIS), boom section (BDIS) and nozzle injection systems (NDIS). A major motivation to develop DIS is to extend the flexibility of applying different pesticides, to advance precision of application , and to enhance the operator comfort and safety. The ultimate goal is to develop a system that works together real-time with detection systems and only treats infested areas. As the injection of pesticides near to the nozzle would be most acceptable technology, further optimisation is required. Based on a response time analysis, a control algorithm is proposed for quicker response of the injection system and new injection valve covering the full range of treatment rates is described. Results of the mixing process are presented as well as the effect of using different supply devices i.e. gear and diaphragm pumps, and air tanks for pesticide injection. In addition, switching of carrier in a DIS to save water and enlarge the capacity of sprayer is discussed along with the aspect of operator safety and tubing system rinsing.

Keywords

Direct Injection Injection Point Nozzle Injection Carrier Flow Injection Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V.  2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institut für Landtechnik, Technology of Crop FarmingBonnGermany

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