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Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Application of Clone Libraries: Syntrophic Acetate Degradation to Methane in a High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoir – Culture-Based and 16S rRNA Genes Characterisation

  • Natalya M. Shestakova
  • Valeriy S. Ivoilov
  • Tatiana P. Tourova
  • Sergey S. Belyaev
  • Andrei B. Poltaraus
  • Tamara N. Nazina
Conference paper

Abstract

The presence of microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs has been established about 100 years ago. Microbiological, radioisotope, molecular biological and biogeochemical techniques have been used to investigate microbial diversity and activity in the oilfields. These techniques were applied separately and the composition of the microbial community and its geochemical activity remained poorly understood.

Keywords

Clone Library Acetoclastic Methanogen Archaeal Clone Syntrophic Bacterium Biotechnological Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (4174.2008.4) and the Russian Academy of Sciences (Programs ‘Molecular and Cellular Biology’ and ‘Scientific Basis for the Biotechnologies for Recovery of Heavy and Residual Oil Based on the Study of Microbial Processes in Productive Reservoirs’).

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Copyright information

© Springer Netherlands 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalya M. Shestakova
    • 1
  • Valeriy S. Ivoilov
    • 1
  • Tatiana P. Tourova
    • 1
  • Sergey S. Belyaev
    • 1
  • Andrei B. Poltaraus
    • 2
  • Tamara N. Nazina
    • 3
  1. 1.Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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