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Science in the Context of Industrial Application: The Case of the Philips Natuurkundig Laboratorium

  • Marc J. de Vries
Chapter
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 274)

Abstract

In this chapter the history of the Philips Natuurkundig Laboratorium is used for a critical analysis of terms such as “fundamental”, “applied”, “Mode-1” and “Mode-2”. In the first place, it is made clear that such terms often had a rhetorical value rather than one that aims at explaining different research contents. In the second place it is shown that the normal use of those terms contains a confusion of dichotomies that needs to be disentangled in order to reach a more proper way of distinguishing between different types of research.

Keywords

Silicon Nitride Contract Research Concrete Application Product Portfolio Product Division 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Eindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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