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Sources of Adoption Data

  • Mary Ann Davis
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE, volume 29)

Abstract

Chapter 3 presents an overview of data issues along with a listing of adoption data sources and their limitations. Data for demographic analyses generally are from three sources: vital statistics or registration data, Census Data, and large scale surveys (Poston & Bouvier, 2010). In the United States (U. S.) there is no unified vital statistics or registration system for child adoptions despite over 60 years of efforts to obtain a single accurate registration of adoptions. Instead, adoptions statistics are compiled from data from multiple sources (public child welfare agencies, state courts, private adoption agencies, and tribal agencies) with no cross referencing, making trends in adoptions difficult to discern. In spite of the lack of a single source, there are multiple sources of existing data which can be combined to provide a demographic analysis of the adoption of children in the U. S.

Keywords

Child Welfare Homeland Security Adopted Child Hague Convention Intercountry Adoption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologySam Houston State UniversityHuntsvilleUSA

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