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Alternative Philosophical Perspectives on the Origin and Nature of Human Rights

  • Sonja C. Grover
Chapter
Part of the Ius Gentium: Comparative Perspectives on Law and Justice book series (IUSGENT, volume 6)

Abstract

We begin this inquiry by exploring the right to vote as an essential aspect of a citizen’s right to full integration into a particular State. In that regard, the right to vote is held to be fundamentally grounded on the natural inherent right each person possesses as a human being to belong to a particular society. The right thus exists whether recognized in law or not, and regardless whether, in practice, the individual is prevented for some reason or another from exercising that right as a citizen of the State in question (due, for instance, to legal incapacity to vote related to statutory bars based on chronological age requirements for eligibility to vote; actual mental incapacity compromising the very specific skill set involved in the behaviour of voting etc.). Voting then is a prime manifestation of the basic human rights of free association and free expression. The denial of the vote consequently is the denial of a basic human right. That denial is, furthermore, a vehicle for marginalizing an identifiable group and potentially rendering it relatively powerless. Such marginalization, in turn, is likely to contribute to the group’s psychological disengagement from the society.

Keywords

Human Dignity Dominican Republic International Criminal Court International Criminal Rome Statute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fac. EducationLakehead UniversityThunder BayCanada

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