Basic Measures

  • David A. Swanson
  • Jeff Tayman
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE, volume 31)

Abstract

Demographic analysis and population estimation requires the use of quantitative measures and graphical techniques. This chapter discusses commonly used measures in demography, geography, and statistics (e.g., Barber 1988: Chapter 3; Freedman, Pisani, and Purves 2007; Siegel and Swanson 2004; Smith, Tayman, and Swanson 2001: Chapter 2). We also present graphical techniques for presenting and analyzing tabular and spatial data (e.g., Jacoby 1997, 1998; Krygier and Wood 2011; Tufte 1990, 1997, 2001; Tyner, 2010).

Keywords

Census Tract Crude Death Rate Location Quotient Voter Registration Scatterplot Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Swanson
    • 1
  • Jeff Tayman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of California RiversideRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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