Other Methods

  • David A. Swanson
  • Jeff Tayman
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE, volume 31)

Abstract

This chapter covers methods that are sufficiently different from those discussed in Chapters 8 through 11 to warrant a separate chapter. However, it should come as no surprise that pieces of some of these methods are related to the methods already discussed. All of these general approaches are sufficiently complicated that examples cannot be provided here. The idea in this chapter is to provide an overview of the methods and point those of you interested in using any or all of them to resources that provide more details.

Keywords

General Social Survey Administrative Record United States Postal Service Applied Demography Spatial Demography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Swanson
    • 1
  • Jeff Tayman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of California RiversideRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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