Between Spaces: Understanding Movement to and from Prison as an HIV Risk Factor

Chapter

Abstract

In the United States, the prevalence of HIV among people who are incarcerated, or have a history of incarceration, is higher than among the general public. Similarly, HIV rates are highest in United States neighborhoods that are disproportionately impacted by incarceration, parole and probation. The association between incarceration and HIV has been partially attributed to high-risk sex and drug use behavior inside correctional facilities. The lack of access to condoms or clean syringes in United States prisons and most jails makes sexual intercourse and injection drug use in these places risky. Research has also found that the disruption of primary sexual relationships resulting from incarceration is associated with an increase in sexual risk in the community, including multiple partners and concurrency. Here, we explore numerous disruptions created by incarceration, including sexual partnerships, to better understand the community-based HIV risk that is produced by the movement to and from prison. Building on Clear et al.’s (Justice Quarterly 20:33–64, 2003) research about the impact of coercive mobility on neighborhood crime rates, we use theories of social disorganization to suggest how criminal justice-induced movement creates HIV risk for both individuals who are incarcerated and members of their social networks by undermining relationship, housing, and economic stability. Preliminary findings from a mixed methods study of parolees and probationers illustrate these arguments and suggest further avenues for HIV prevention research.

Keywords

Criminal Justice African American Woman Criminal Justice System Collective Efficacy Sexual Partnership 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Center on Health, Risk and SocietyAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Silberman School of Social Work, Hunter CollegeCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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